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08 Nov '16

Debate 2016 Dry Vs. Steam

Debate 2016 Dry Vs. Steam

Which is better for salon purposes? While both can serve the purpose to sterilize equipment, there are distinct variances between the two. Let’s explore the differences.

Dry-heat
When using a dry-heat system, you are essentially raising the temperature to approximately 338°F under normal air pressure and holding that for about an hour.
Dry heat is typically used for items that cannot be placed in a steam unit, such as powders, glassware or instruments that may corrode. The convection/conduction method of a dry heat autoclave can also yield poor results if the chamber is densely packed.

Dry heat sterilizers may also increase electricity consumption and time to process.

Steam Autoclaves
A more resourceful use of time and energy is the steam sterilization method. Unlike the high temperature and time required for the dry method, steam only rises to 250-270°F for 15-30 minutes to annihilate the most resistant spores. The moisture is a more efficient conductor of heat and more likely to penetrate the load entirely. This method can realize a significant savings in both energy consumption and labor. Per the CDC, steam sterilization is the recommended process because it has the largest margin of safety due to its reliability, consistency and lethality.¹

So, which is better for the salon?
Steam would be the preference in part because of the time factor, energy conservation, long-term cost and margin of safety. Concern regarding metal implements becoming dull or rusted due to the moist process of the steam autoclave seem to be overblown. In my experience, from using quality implements in a steam autoclave for more than 4 years, I have not experience premature dulling of implements or rusting. I found more rust establishing from soaking too long in liquid disinfectant.

While the dry heat sterilizers tend to have a lower initial price point, the on-going cost of the dry sterilizer is higher due, in part, to the nylon bags necessary for proper packaging. Steam autoclaves have a long term, lower use cost. The pouches are more cost effective, especially for the salon that uses a multitude of pouched implements in a day.

The goal is to provide the safest environment for both the client and the technician. While we don’t work in sterile environments, we can use sterile equipment to lower the risk of infections and lawsuits from infections.

 Find what you need at Safe Salon Supply.

03 Feb '16

What are the 2 best new Nail Trade Shows in 2016?

Safe Salon Supply, LLC is excited to announce that we will be vendors at 2, brand new, nails-only events in the US! Please join us!

April 23-26, 2016
Houston, Texas
www.bestnailshowtx.com

Best lil' Nail Show logo

WHAT IS Best Lil’ Nail Show TEXAS?

Align with the stars for the 1st Annual Best Lil’ Nail Show TEXAS!
The Best Lil’ Nail Show TEXAS is creating a constellation of the brightest industry stars: educators, manufacturers and technicians in that personable way only The Lone Star state can offer.. Texas means ‘allies’ or ‘friends.’ We invite you to be a shining part of our firmament!

✨Events, classes and demonstrations mean enduring impressions and results!

✨Presence galore among well established industry greats with unparalleled ROI support.

✨Excellent industry visibility to a nail-only audience.

✨It wouldn’t be Texas without hot nail talent, fun and a lot of blinging personality!

✨Open to licensed beauty professionals only!

✨ Each attendee has the chance to WIN a fab door prize!

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Saturday, May 14, 2016
Chattanooga, TN
Click here for Safety Summit Tickets

Medinail Leraning Center logo

MEDINAIL SAFETY SUMMIT

MediNail Learning Center is hosting the first annual Safety Summit for Nail Techs and Medical Assistants in Chattanooga, TN.  The event will feature speeches from well-known industry leaders as well as special classes during the day.

This first-ever event brings the two worlds of beauty and health into one location. Networking between passionate nail professionals and podiatrists will help our industry gain the respect it deserves by showing the medical professions how much we care about our clients’ health and always put that first. Let's join together to dispel the myths about our industry!

Leading industry companies will be in attendance to shop and join classes for continuing education.*

*(Check with your state on continuing education rules. Classes may not be eligible for CEUs.)

 

06 Dec '15

Did you notice something?

Posted by Crystal Pike

Regular appointments with the same nail tech are important for more than just her income stream. It's important for your health. A cautious nail tech will review your health history with you at each appointment. It may be as simple as asking how you are feeling and if there's been any changes in your life since your last visit.

As your service is performed, while you are chatting, your tech is examining your nails. If she notices something that she hadn't seen before, she will bring it to your attention. Discussing these matters could save your life. A good nail tech will put your Health Before PolishTM.

Read more at Nails Magazine: 

 http://www.nailsmag.com/article/113423/something-to-talk-about-brown-spots

12 Nov '15

Warts in the Salon

Posted by Crystal Pike

A salon environment is a place that your health should come first. While it is beyond the scope of a service provider to treat or diagnose a medical condition, they should be trained in bringing a concern to your attention. Covering up an issue is not professional and could lead to liablity issues. If your nail tech suggests you seek medical advice, please do so before your next appointment. Let the physician know that your nail tech asked you to seek medical advice so they know you are visiting a salon that puts your health first.

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"Clients expect nail techs to identify and recommend treatment for a wide variety of nail disorders and diseases. Though this expectation is understandable, techs are constrained legally, limited to beautifying the nail and leaving the rest to those with a medical degree. However, it’s important for your sake and the safety of your clients to recognize potential problems — even if you have to tread carefully when you’re talking with your clients about how to fix them. Warts may be one of those problems."

Read more here from Nails Magazine here.

http://www.nailsmag.com/article/113172/something-to-talk-about-warts

02 Nov '15

First Post (well, that's appropriate)

At Safe Salon Supply, LLC, we want to help educate consumers on what to expect with a safe salon service.

There are a few places you can go to see if the salon of your choice has a Safe Salon Rating:


www.safesalonrating.com

www.westerilize.com

And there will be blogs posted on SafeSalonSupply.com to help educate consumers on safe salon practices as well.